History of the Christian Church

Communio Sanctorum is an outstanding resource, a podcast produced by Lance Ralston.

From his website Santorum.us  he says “Communio Sanctorum is Latin for “The Communion of Saints.”  This site is the blog companion for the podcast Communio Sanctorum, a weekly podcast on the History of the Christian Church.

Church History can be a complex and confusing subject with endless lists of names, dates, and issues. The podcast is an attempt to give believers a popular and non-academic review of church history in a manageable format with episodes that are under a half hour.

While the Latin phrase Communio Sanctorum has been in use for centuries, the German pastor and theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s dissertation was titled Sanctorum Communio. Written at the age of only 21, the book is a monumental tome describing Bonhoeffer’s ideas on the work of the Spirit in the Church building a community of the redeemed.”

If you love learning and would like to know more about the history of the Christian Church this is a wonderful resource you’ll no doubt greatly enjoy.

Apostle’s Creed

I believe in God, the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth.

And in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died and was buried. He descended into hell. The third day He rose again from the dead. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God the Father Almighty. From thence He will come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy Christian Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

Christian: the ancient text reads “catholic,” meaning the
whole Church as it confesses the
wholeness of Christian doctrine.

The Nicene Creed

I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth and of all things visible and invisible.

And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only‐begotten Son of God, begotten of His Father before all worlds, God of God, Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, being of one substance with the Father, by whom all things were made; who for us men and for our salvation came down from heaven and was incarnate by the Holy Spirit of the virgin Mary and was made man; and was crucified also for us under Pontius Pilate. He suffered and was buried. And the third day He rose again according to the Scriptures and ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of the Father. And He will come again with glory to judge both the living and the dead, whose kingdom will have no end.

And I believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord and giver of life, who proceeds from the Father and the Son, who with the Father and the Son together is worshiped and glorified, who spoke by the prophets. And I believe in one holy Christian and apostolic Church I acknowledge one Baptism for the remission of sins, and I look for the resurrection of the dead and the life of the world to come.
Amen.

Us men means all people.
Christian: the ancient text reads “catholic,” meaning the
whole Church as it confesses the wholeness of Christian doctrine.

 

Trust your heavenly Father

You have been unable to trust God to give you day by day your daily bread, and therefore you have been craving for what you call “some provision for the future.” You want a more trusty provider than providence, a better security than God’s promise. You are unable to trust your heavenly Father’s word, a few bonds of some half bankrupt foreign government you consider to be far more reliable; you can trust the Sultan of Turkey, or the Viceroy of Egypt, but not the God of the whole earth!

In a thousand ways we insult the Lord by imagining “the things which are seen” to be more substantial than his unseen omnipotence. We ask God to give us at once what we do not require at present, and may never need at all; at bottom the reason for such desires may be found in a disgraceful distrust of him which makes us imagine that great stores are needful to ensure our being provided for. Brethren, are you not to blame here, and do you expect the Lord to aid and abet your folly? Shall God pander to your distrust? Shall he give you a heap of cankering gold and silver for thieves to steal, and chests of garments to feed moths? Would you have the Lord act as if he admitted the correctness of your suspicions and confessed to unfaithfulness? God forbid!

Expect not, therefore, to be heard when your prayer is suggested by an unbelieving heart: “Commit thy way unto the Lord; trust also in him and he shall bring it to pass.”

From a sermon by Charles Haddon Spurgeon entitled “The Conditions of Power in Prayer,” delivered March 23, 1873.

The real value to giving.

W. E. Vine, The Church and the Churches:

Love and devotion to God! That imparts the real value to giving. And this perhaps serves to explain why no command as to the amount is laid down for believers. To obey a command stating the amount or proportion would be easy, but what exercise of heart would there be? Where would the motive lie? Loyalty would be superseded by mechanical religion. Love would be replaced by formalism. Both individuals and local churches would lose their sense of the high motive which should inspire in the offering a loving response to the love of the great Giver Himself. (Fincastle, VA: Scripture Truth Book Company, n.d. .)

Vine was born in 1873. Plymouth Brethren